Willamette Promise
  • Will my transcripts be sent automatically after I graduate high school?

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    No. Students must request their transcript from Western Oregon University and provide the address to where the transcripts are to be sent using the following LINK.

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  • When I register, my SSID said it is already in use.

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    If you have registered for the Willamette Promise in the past, there is a good chance you are already registered. Please contact us and we can verify if you are registered or not and update any information as need be.

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  • I keep getting an error message when I register at WOU.

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    The "Error 100" is a common error students see. This error occurs when a student closes out their window or browser when they are directed to the Western Oregon Univerity registration page. The error will fix itself within a week of your initial registration date. After a week has passed, use this link to complete your registration with WOU. You will be asked to provide your legal first and last name, SSID, date of birth, citizenship status, and SSN.

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  • Will I receive any type of confirmation after I register?

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    When you complete your registration through ORSkills, you will receive a confirmation email with the email you used to register. When you complete your registration with WOU, a "Thank you for registering" window will appear confirming your registration. No email from WOU will be sent in regards to your registration.

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  • Do I have to provide my SSN?

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    Providing your SSN is not required but highly encouraged. When it comes time to register for college, financial aid, and scholarships, this information will be required.

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  • I forgot my username and password.

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    When students register for the Willamette Promise, no username or password is created.

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  • When and how do I pay my Willamette Promise fee?

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    Students will need to use this link to complete their payment for the Willamette Promise. Students can pay when they sign up for the program, or after they decide if they want to accept their grade or not. Payments are then recorded on their Willamette Promise account. Students are not required to make the payment if they are not accepting their grade. We require a one-time yearly fee of $30.00 for any number of classes taken in the school year. If you are in need of a fee application, you can find the application here.

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  • Does Willamette Promise help students who are Free and Reduced Lunch?

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    Yes. You will find our fee waiver application here. Fill out the required information and we will take care of the rest.

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  • Can I order an unofficial transcript?

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    No, however, we can provide you with information in regards to credits you earned and the grade. The transcript you order through Western Oregon University will always be an official transcript.

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  • Can I see my transcript without ordering one?

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    No, in order to view your transcript, you must order one from Western Oregon University. 

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  • How long does it take for my transcript request to be processed?

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    Transcripts requested from Western Oregon University take 48 hours to process. This time period does not include the time it takes for your transcript to be physically delivered via mail. If students have questions about the transcript process, they will need to contact the registrar's office at Western Oregon University.

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  • How can I find out what credits I have earned so far?

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    You can find our one of two ways. You may contact your teacher and they can give you the information in regards to if you earned the credit for the class or not, or contact the Willamette promise and we can provide the same information to you.

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  • Will my transcript be automatically sent to my college/university?

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    No. In order for our college and or university to receive your transcript, you will need to request one from the institution your received credit from. Please refer to our Transcript and Transferability page for more information.

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  • Will my credit transfer to another college?

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    Every college and university accepts credits differently. Please refer to the Transfer and Transferability section for more information. Be sure you are in contact with the college(s) you are looking at and understand their policies when it comes to accepting dual credit.

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  • I need to correct/update my information. How do I do this?

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    Please contact the Willamette Promise and we are happy to update any information for you.

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  • What are the forms of Accelerated Credit in Oregon?

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    Dual Credit

    In Dual Credit courses, the high school teacher is qualified to act as a proxy faculty member for the college or university when teaching the course. These courses are sufficiently similar to enable the students to be described as "taking a course" from the post-secondary institution. Through ORS 340.310, HECC was charged with developing standards for dual credit and other high school-based college credit partnership programs.

    Sponsored Dual Credit

    In Sponsored Dual Credit courses, a high school teacher partners with a sponsoring faculty member at a college or university to offer the course. These courses are sufficiently similar to enable the student to be described as "taking a course" from the post-secondary institution. Through ORS 340.310, HECC has charged with developing standards for these sponsored dual credit programs.

    Assessment Based Learning Credit

    In Assessment Based Learning Credit, students do not enroll in a college course but are provided an opportunity to earn college credit by demonstrating they have achieved a course's learning outcomes. Through ORS 340.310, HECC has charged with developing standards for these assessment based learning credit programs.

    Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs

    Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs are offered by high schools across the state. Each year, colleges and universities in Oregon renew the Statewise AP and IB Course Credit Policy for these courses, and the HECC coordinates with Oregon campuses on making and publishing these updates.

    Expanded Options programs

    Expanded Options programs established by school districts provide opportunities for at-risk students to take courses at eligible post-secondary institutions. in 2005, Senate Bill 300 created the Expanded Options program to provide eligible high school students early entry into post-secondary education, with specific provisions and supports for at-risk students.

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  • What type of credit does WOU offer?

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    WOU offers Assessment Based Learning credits that do not have set add/drop dates for the course. To allow the "no risk" option for students we have developed a program that follows Sponsored Dual Credit standards with the exception of the registration and drop dates so that students have flexibility. Students must still register and participate in the course at the high school to be eligible for credits in this program, which differs from the true definition of ABL so we may ensure a rigorous experience or each student.

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  • Will the college credits I earn in high school save me and my parents money?

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    Yes! If you and your family are not paying or not paying much, for the college credits you earn in high school, chances are you will save money. Check with the colleges/universities that you are looking to attend to learn how the credit earned fits into the school's degree or certificate program.

    If you are sure which college or university you'll attend (or if you'll go to college at all), go ahead and find out how the credit counts at a nearby college or university anyway. Each college or university has a policy for accepting credits. How the college credit you earn in high school counts toward a degree or certificate may be different at each institution. Here is a useful website to help you: http://c3oregon.org.

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  • Why should I take accelerated credit?

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    Earning (or registering for) college credit in high school can have many benefits for students and their families. Research has shown that students who take college credit before they leave high school are likely to enroll in college and persist through their first year of college.

    Here are some noteworthy reasons to engage in college credit before you leave high school:

    1. Get a head start on college courses.
    2. Build a college-going identity.
    3. Receive transfer credit.
    4. Potentially save time to degree.
    5. Potentially save money.
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  • Will my credits transfer to another college?

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    Dual Credit students and families want to know how their credit will transfer. This is a question that does not always have a simple answer as it is required by higher education's regional accreditation to determine whether or not to accept credits. 

    When transferring credit, most Registrar or Admission Offices can handle initial student questions about dual credit transferability, but a student will not know how their credit officially transfers until the student is fully-admitted, declared their major, and is working with academic advisors at the institution.

    When thinking of transferring credit, there are a couple of different ways dual credit may transfer:

    • Lower-Division Transfer – credit transfers into the student's institution of choice as a lower-division transfer credit. This credit is acknowledged by the institution and may fit within a student's degree or lower-division requirements.
    • Direct Equivalent Course – dual credit class or classes transfer as a specific course at student's institution of choice. For example: Math 111 – College Algebra from Western Oregon University transfers as Math 111 – College Algebra at the University of Oregon.
    • Degree Requirement Transfer – these courses are transferable and count toward a course needed for a student's selected degree program. For  example: Speech 111 – Public Speaking is transferred from Lane Community College to Oregon State as a direct equivalent and part of degree requirements for a Mechanical Engineering degree.
    • No Transfer – credit is not considered an equivalent transferable course.

    Many state and private institutions have tools on their Registrar’s website that will assist in understanding how dual credit, AP, or IB credit will transfer. Below are links to these equivalency webpages.

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  • Are there barriers or issues for students taking college credit in high school?

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    Ideally, college credit in high school encourages all students to pursue and enroll in college. One goal of dual credit is to encourage students to take credit that will count as transfer credit in the student’s future degree program. At times, taking too much college credit in high school can present barriers later in a student’s academic career. Should a student take more than 2 or 3 college courses during high school, students should try to speak with an academic advisor at the college they might attend. Students, parents, and advisors are encouraged to think about credits as "credits with a purpose" - those that will count towards their college goals. 

    Put another way, when pursuing dual credit opportunities, it is wise to understand how the credit will transfer or to know what degree program the student hopes to pursue. Knowing these key pieces of information can help high school and college advisors map what courses are most appropriate to take. Many students will not know what degree or college they plan on attending. In these cases, students are encouraged to take “intentional” college credit. “Intentional” college credit, are credits that have more transferability than others and tend to be in general subject areas such as Math, Science, Writing, etc.

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  • 150% Rule

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    One barrier that a student may face when being granted a high number of college credits while in high school is the Federal Financial Aid 150% rule. This regulation applies to all students and is in place to help students stay on track to receiving their degree. Once a student has received 150% of the number of credits required to complete a degree then their financial aid is maxed out and no more federal loans are available. For example, if a student needs 60 credits hours to graduate and they have 90 credit hours (60 hrs. X 150 percent = 90 hrs.) their ability to receive financial aid may be terminated.

    Students and families should be aware of this rule and attempt to seek credit opportunities that get students on track to a degree.

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  • Oregon Promise- 90 Credit Limit

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    Students who are engaging in dual credit or college credit opportunities should be aware of the 90 credit rule within the Oregon Promise. Oregon Promise is a state grant that covers most tuition costs at any Oregon Community College for recent high school graduates and GED recipients who meet the eligibility requirements.

    The 90-credit limit is a limit on the total number of college credits you have attempted to earn. Once you have attempted a total of 90 college credits, you are no longer eligible for Oregon Promise. All of the following types of credits count toward the 90 credit limit:

    • College credits you take while in high school or as part of a high school completion program
    • College credits you take during summer term*
    • College credits you take at another college or university while dual-enrolled at a community college
    • College credits for courses you withdraw from or fail
    • Any other college credits you attempt or complete prior to and during your time as an Oregon Promise recipient

    *Oregon Promise does not pay for summer courses. Information above was provided by Oregon Promise.

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